Printable Prosthetics: Brainstorming

An illustrative hand

An illustrative hand

My overall designs for a printable parametric hand are still far from done.  And, yet, I’ve come a long long way since jumping headfirst into the realm of open source prosthetics a little more than 30 days ago.12

Forgive the digression, dear reader, before I return you to considerations of prosthetics. After visiting the Asian Art Museum today with the family, I am feeling particularly inspired to discuss dualities.3 I find I am an often-inspired person. This is a very charitable way to describe myself by what would otherwise colloquially and clinically be considered ADHD. When I am inspired by a new topic, I tend to jump right into it – reading voraciously and trying to learn as much about it as I can. When this happens, I also tend to set aside whatever thing I was most recently working on. This means that recently I’ve done little work on drawing robots (big and small) and a multitude of other small projects that would otherwise be just amazing. However, such inspirations/distractions are not only external to a project – but can also be very much internal to a project. Consider, for instance, feature creep – the adding of ever more features to a project, usually at a faster rate than which features are resolved and refined. In order to combat this aspect of my nature, the wanting to add more and better features, I have developed a coping mechanism. To prevent myself from falling down the rabbit hole of features and improvements, I jot them down someplace – either in a blog post4 , in an email to myself, or in a notebook.5 I find that once I’ve externalized and memorialized an idea, I can continue working on a project unfettered and undistracted these other ideas.

To this end, and in the spirit of open source ideals, I will jot down some ideas while I have them:

  • How large and how small are prosthetic designs typically scaled?
    • I wanted to have a range of sizes for which my designs were optimized.  My guess would be no smaller than 85% and not much more than 160% of the size of the existing  Cyborg Beast.  Jorge Zuniga was, again, patient enough to discuss this with me.  His estimate of a range would be between about 105 – 150%.
  • What is the diameter of the Chicago Screws typically used in the creation of a Cyborg Beast?
    • From the retailer’s website, it appears the “barrel” diameter is 0.2 inches, or 5.08mm.  I’ll need to make some adjustments to holes for the Chicago Screws in the designs.
  • How important is hyperextension of these fingers?
    • The designs of the Cyborg Beast include fingers that can bend “backwards” very slightly.  Each finger joint includes a “stop” at the back of the joint.  While certainly useful, I question their necessity.  I previously designed a connection system for printable snap-fit parts ((For use in an equally noble project)) that connect very tightly and/or bend with a user specified degree of movement.  The point with me mentioning these parts is that the “stop” used at the back of each knuckle and joint in the Cyborg Beast may not be necessary at all.
  • How necessary are metal Chicago Screws to strength and durability of the hand and fingers?  
    • Before you laugh, consider this question – what is the weakest point of any given finger which uses a metal Chicago Screw when having to deal with lateral forces?  I would postulate the weakest points would be those thin plastic parts surrounding the Chicago Screws themselves.  Thus, even though the hand incorporates metal pins, I have to wonder just how much strength they are providing to the overall device.  It would be easy to conceive of a plastic prosthetic hand that was so small that there wasn’t a lot of plastic around each metal screw6.  In such a case, the weakest points would be plastic surrounding the metal parts.  Extending this conjecture, of what use are metal fasteners to a design that is primarily plastic?  The best guess I can offer is that they allow reliable and smooth operation.
  • Work on proportional fingers
    • In designing the fingers, I worked to be able to make them customizable in several different ways.  The user may specify whether the fingers have the “star grip” pads, whether the finger should be slightly shorter or longer, and scale the finger up or down – without distortion to the hardware and cord channels.
    • I need to add at least three additional options to these parametric designs.  The designs should include the option to add “mouse ears” and easily removable support structures.  Additionally, the design should also allow the user to change the diameter of the finger.  I did implement this, somewhat, in part of the design.  Without implementation throughout the entire design, these partial attempts aren’t helpful.
    • In creating the fingers shown above, I adjusted their lengths to conform to the measurements of my own hand.7 Next time, I think I would also measure finger diameters.
    • I think I should create a way to prevent finger parts from being mixed up accidentally while printing.  A possible solution is to include “mouse ears” with each finger – but embed an identifying mark in each mouse ear to label the parts.
  • Ideas on making a better parametric palm
    • The palm should be redesigned so that the fingers, at the appropriate lengths, would fit into it.  I designed the fingers quite a while since working on the palm.  I haven’t had a chance to ensure the parts would mesh well without adjustment to the scale.
    • On an entirely different note, I have an idea to redesign the entire palm.  By carefully placing deformed spheres, I was able to design a palm.  Using a similar process, I subtracted out a void for the user’s hand.  The result is a palm with an uneven thickness throughout.  Uniform thickness isn’t necessarily an interesting or useful goal.  That said, it could lead to a reduction in unnecessary plastic.  If I were to redesign the palm, I could design the internal area first8 – and then use the “Minkowski” function to create a uniformly thick shell around the internal form.  The bottom would have to be sliced off and the original internal area would need to be subtracted from it.
  • Ideas on making a more realistic hand
    • My designs so far are based primarily on the Cyborg Beast, with some minor changes.  The “Flexy-Handappears to be very organic and realistic.  It also features flexible printed connections between each finger segment.  Additionally, each finger is comprised of three segments – rather than two like the Cyborg Beast.  Interestingly, since the flexible connections between segments allows the hand to return to an “open” position, the hand only requires five tension cords – rather than five tension cords and five elastic cords.  The fingers appear to not have any “stops” behind each joint.  I have to wonder how having three segments to each finger impacts the function.  Does it allow the hand to better grip things?  Does it make the hand less sturdy?
  • Masculine/Feminine hands
    • One well-intentioned comment to my latest designs is that they are “pretty.”9 While I accept the compliment with the spirit in which it was given, it immediately made me wonder – is the hand I designed “feminine?”  Then it occurred to me that with more design effort, I could make “feminine” and “masculine” version of these hands.  I think the primary differences would be two-fold – thinner fingers and a less “hefty” palm for a more feminine version and a thicker and perhaps more “blocky” palm for a more masculine hand.
  • New developments
    • There have been a number of interesting and new developments and experiments of late.10 In no particular order, these ideas are:
  • Discussions with a 7-year-old
    • A few days ago my daughter and I were jotting down some ideas in my sketchbook.  As we did so, she saw some of the notes from the e-NABLE meeting on 3/21/2014 – including several sketches.  We discussed the problem – affordable, customized, and comfortable prosthetics.  We talked about amniotic band syndrome, how fibrous amniotic bands affect fetuses, and the different ways in which these bands can cause11 deformities to single fingers, whole hands, and a range of changes in between.  I explained how Mr. Jose Delgado Jr. had a $42,000.00 myoelectric prosthetic, the problems he has with that prosthetic, how and why he prefers his $50.00 printed replacement, and how for the price of his one prosthetic people could make 840 more prosthetics.12 She asked, “Why can’t someone use a stump to operate a hand?” I replied that this was exactly how these prosthetics worked – and I drew a few simplified sketches of the Cyborg Beast.  Her next question was, “Why can’t it move side to side?”  I said that Mr. David Ogreman had designed such a prosthetic.

  1. My first concrete step was going to an e-NABLE meeting in San Francisco on 3/21/2014. []
  2. The above picture is slightly misleading.  I haven’t confirmed that the fingers I’ve designed will properly fit into the palm that I’ve designed – or that the thumb would work at all.  Thus, the picture is partially a parlor trick and partially an indication of where I hope to take this design. []
  3. Many of the gods and goddesses in Eastern religions embody dual natures – creation/destruction, life/death, etc []
  4. In one of my several different blogs. Besides, what could be more ADHD than having 3+ blogs?!? []
  5. You may not find this as amusing as I do – but I probably have about four different sketch/notebooks. []
  6. Say, only 1mm []
  7. From pinky finger to thumb, the non-scientific measurements from knuckle to finger/thumb tip were 77mm, 102mm, 106mm, 92mm, and 72mm []
  8. Using the deformed spheres and hull trick []
  9. Thanks Erik! []
  10. I don’t even know why I’m saying “of late” when I’ve really only been involved a little over 30 days.  I guess becuase these developments are new to me? []
  11. Please forgive my lack of a more politically correct term.  If you’ve got a better or more sensitive phrase, please let me know as I will gladly adopt it []
  12. She wanted to know if he could get a refund! []
April 27, 2014 | Comments Closed

Printable Parametric Prosthetics: Design Features

Parametric fingers - different lengths, same scale, with no distortion to hardware

Parametric fingers – different lengths, same scale, with no distortion to hardware

I’m not ashamed to admit it – I’m proud of these parametric designs like few of my other designs.  I’ve worked to make this design as customizable and organic as possible.  The two modules that define each finger can be customized in two important ways – they can be lengthened1 as well as scaled up or down – without any distortion or change in the size of the holes for the hardware, elastic cords, or tension cords.

Parametric fingers - with grippy bits

Parametric fingers – with grippy bits

Being able to lengthen2 the finger segments is important because it allows the user to create fingers of different lengths, as normal fingers are of different lengths, all without having to actually scale the fingers to different sizes and without causing a change in each finger’s diameter.

As I’ve discussed in earlier posts, being able to scale the parts up and down without distortion to the hardware holes is important because it allows users to use standard hardware throughout different designs.

For now, it’s back to work on the parametric palm to ensure a proper fit with these parts.

  1. Or shortened []
  2. Or shorten []
April 26, 2014 | Comments Closed

Printable Parametric Prosthetics and OpenSCAD: Parametric Optimization

Picking parametric fingers

Picking parametric fingers

This post is intended as a set of “guidelines” to creating a parametric design in OpenSCAD.

Last Sunday afternoon was spent working out a parametric design for printable prosthetic fingers.  Using the OpenSCAD function “hull” it’s relatively easy to crank out a nifty organic appearing design.  Admittedly, you have to have a working knowledge the basic union/difference/intersection function first.  However, once you do it’s really quite easy.

The feature of the design I’m most proud of is the “nail” part of the finger tip.  I designed the “nail” by using the OpenSCAD function “intersection()” on two cylinders.  The little “nubs”1 consist of a small cube, rotated so a corner is pointed straight up combined, with an identically situated cube rotated slightly.

When I’m designing something to be parametric, I usually don’t really start out designing it that way.  I first strive to create a form in OpenSCAD that resembles closely the thing I wish to design.  Then, I poke through the design code looking for those elements that are related to the design aspects I’m interested in changing based on parameters.  Once located, I replace those parts of the design code with variables that can be specified when the module is called.  I realize this is kind of a “high level” description of my design process for parametric things, but it’s still the best description.

Since last Sunday I’ve really done a lot with the design.  Some simplifying and a lot of improvements.  In the next post I’ll go over these features.  I’m really excited to show these off.  :)

  1. Meant to give the finger grip and texture []
| Comments Closed

Printable Prosthetics Fingers and OpenSCAD Design Tips

Solid finger tip for Cyborg Beast

Solid finger tip for Cyborg Beast

Above is my first attempt at designing a “solid” finger for the Cyborg Beast DIY printable prosthetic in OpenSCAD.1 The reason this is a “solid” finger is that I haven’t subtracted out any material to allow this partial finger to connect with anything else.

The problem with scaling (up or down) any design that requires fasteners and hardware is that when you do, the holes for the hardware are similarly scaled.  This leads to more post-printing work drilling holes to widen them or to find larger fasteners that won’t rattle around in too-large holes.

Thus, if the hardware consists of 3mm screws, the holes for the hardware should be 3mm no matter how much the parts are scaled up or down.  To make matters more interesting, not all holes in the model should be excepted from scaling.  The above finger tip has a plastic end that is supposed to fit into a mid-finger piece – and those parts should be scaled up or down according to the size of the overall hand.  Thus, some voids should be scaled2 and others not at all.3

I’m rather happy with how this finger has turned out so far.  It has most of what I understand to be the essential features of the Cyborg Beast fingertips, including little nubs along the finger pad to allow for gripping.  I intend to make this an option, in case a user would rather use something like Plasti-Dip to make grippy finger pads, rather than relying on printed plastic bumps.

However, converting a decent design into a parametric design requires a little more work.  The way I go about designing a parametric model is to first design one instance of the thing, in this case the finger tip.  My next step is to poke through the OpenSCAD code to locate those aspects parts that contribute to the models’ essential features – length of the finger tip, for instance.  Once I’ve found these bits, I then try to modify them so that I can insert different variables and arrive at sane variations on the model.

Wish me luck!4

  1. If this is your first time tuning in, check out the prior posts in this series using the links at the bottom of this post []
  2. Where parts meet []
  3. Such as holes for hardware []
  4. See, this is a post about finger tips and design tips!  Oh, man, I crack myself up! []
April 19, 2014 | Comments Closed

OpenSCAD Intermediates: How to Make Complex Organic Shapes

Cyborg Beast OpenSCAD prototype

Cyborg Beast OpenSCAD prototype

OpenSCAD tutorials for the MakerBot blog.  In that OpenSCAD tutorial series I covered the basics of the OpenSCAD interface, how to make 2D forms, how to make some basic 3D forms, how to position those forms in 3D space, the different ways to combine forms, how to create mashups of one or more existing STL’s and OpenSCAD forms, how to use modules to reuse your code to make your life easier, how to extrude flat 2D forms into 3D forms, and how to fix design problems.  One of the last tutorials was on how to make organic looking shapes using OpenSCAD.1  However, I have a few design tricks left to share.  A little over 18 months ago I left off the series suggesting as new topics.2 There’s one particular “trick” I am using a lot as I work on designing a printable parametric prosthetic. This trick is somewhat easier to explain using pictures.  Suppose you wanted to make a shape that looked something like a “jack,” but you wanted it to have curved surfaces at the center.  Let’s see what happens when we try to use the “hull()” command.  Do do this, we’ll make a sphere at the center and put eight more spheres around it.  The code for this example is basically irrelevant, but I’ll provide it anyhow.

sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);

There’s a much easier way to create the 8 “orbiting” spheres, but that’s another post unto itself.  :)  Here’s what the above code will create:

Nine little spheres (I named one of them Pluto!)

Nine little spheres (I named one of them Pluto!)

Now, let’s use the “hull()” command to wrap around these spheres.

hull()
{
sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10);
)

That code will make this:

Nine spheres to... a box?

Nine spheres to… a box?

The result looks nothing like a jack! It looks more like a box with rounded edges. The limitation with the “hull()” command3 is that it connects all the outside points from the various shapes.  The result is more like what the objects would look like if you covered them in plastic wrap – but not what they would look like if you tried to use shrink wrap.4 However, our goal is to get a jack.  How should we go about this?  The same way we eat an elephant.56 We need to use “hull()” multiple times7 to connect the central sphere to the eight surrounding spheres.

hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,0,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,0]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,90]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,180]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }
hull() { sphere(r=10);
rotate([0,180,270]) translate([100,100,100*pow(2,0.5)/1.5]) sphere(r=10); }

The result would look like:

Much better!

Much better!

By breaking the overall design into pieces, you can use the “hull()” command to connect pieces of the design to one another in a seemingly organic fashion.  Here’s a set of pictures of my most recent work that uses these design tricks.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

  1. Full list here:

    1. OpenSCAD Basics: The Setup
    2. OpenSCAD Basics: 2D Forms
    3. OpenSCAD Basics: 3D Forms
    4. OpenSCAD Basics: Manipulating Forms
    5. OpenSCAD Intermediates: Combining Forms
    6. OpenSCAD Intermediates: Mashups
    7. OpenSCAD Intermediates: Modularity
    8. OpenSCAD Intermediates: Extruding 2D Objects
    9. OpenSCAD Intermediates: Fixing Design Problems
    10. OpenSCAD Intermediates: How to Make Organic Shapes
    11. OpenSCAD Design Tips
    12. OpenSCAD Design Tips: How to Make a Customizable Thing

    []

  2. These are, in no particular order:

    • How to sketch an object with OpenSCAD
    • How to easily make regular solids – other than cubes and cylinders, like hexagons, pentagons, octagons, etc
    • How to easily make symmetrical solids
    • How to easily make irregular, but symmetrical solids

    []

  3. I almost typed “problem,” but in this case it probably is just a feature []
  4. That’s the best analogy I can come up with []
  5. One bite at a time. []
  6. It’s such a damn shame when a cool domain name is taken – and there’s nothing there.  Such as eatanelephant.com []
  7. 8 times []
March 30, 2014 | Comments Closed

Has it really been that long?

2012. calendarI just fired up OpenSCAD, my 3D design program of choice, and then it occurred to me that it’s been quite a while since I’ve used it.  A quick search for *.SCAD files on my hard drive revealed I haven’t updated any OpenSCAD documents since 5/13/2012. 1

That’s more than two months!  How can this be?!  I’ve got a pile of ideas stacking up.

How do you organize your ideas?  I created an e-mail address for myself “ideas@DOMAIN.com,” jot down the ideas, and send them to myself constantly.  If I have paper, I’ll sketch the idea out, take a picture, and e-mail the picture to this same address.  I think I probably send myself about two or three e-mails a day.

I can’t wait to jump back into OpenSCAD and work on some of these ideas!!!

  1. Photo courtesy of Asja Borošvia Compfight []

DrawBot – Printed Parts

So far I’ve got three types of printed parts:

  1. Spools
    1. These spools hold the monofilament and are friction fit onto the motor shaft.  You can check out the designs on Thingiverse.
  2. Motor Mounts
    1. The Thingiverse page actually has a lot of information about the motor mounts.  They’re designed in OpenSCAD and are mostly parametric.  Since I’m mounting these motors inside a box, the mounts are designed to go into the corners of the box.
  3. John Abella’s Gondola
    1. I haven’t hooked everything up yet, so I don’t know how well this will work.  I can’t wait to find out!
  4. Arduino Mount
    1. I’m kicking around some ideas for how this would work.  Ideally, I’ll end up designing a bracket that the Arduino and motor shield can just snap into.
Posts in the DrawBot Adventure Series
  1. Wanna make a DrawBot?
  2. DrawBot Resources and Links
  3. DrawBot, the Adventure Begins
  4. DrawBots for the slow learner
  5. DrawBot - The Breakdown
  6. DrawBot - What would you draw?
  7. DrawBot - The Plan!
  8. DrawBot - The Hacks
  9. DrawBot - The Delivery?
  10. DrawBot - The Delivery, Part II
  11. DrawBot – The Delivery, Part III
  12. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part I
  13. DrawBot – The Software, Part I (and an existential conversation)
  14. DrawBot – The Delivery, Part IV
  15. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part II
  16. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part III
  17. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part IV
  18. DrawBot – Halp!!! No - seriously, a little help?
  19. DrawBot – The Face Palm
  20. DrawBot – The Delivery, Part V
  21. DrawBot – The Silver Lining of Failure
  22. DrawBot – The Delivery, Part VI
  23. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part V
  24. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part VI
  25. DrawBot – Printed Parts
  26. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part VII
  27. DrawBot – The Operation, Part I
  28. DrawBot – The Assembly, Part VIII
  29. DrawBot – The Breakdown, Part II
  30. DrawBot – Printing!
  31. DrawBot – Why are you crying?
  32. DrawBot – Calibration
  33. DrawBot – Pen Selection
  34. DrawBot – How to Recover from a Stalled Print!
  35. DrawBot – Drawing Success(ish)!!!
  36. DrawBot – Pen Selection, Part II
  37. DrawBot – Onwards and Upwards!
  38. DrawBot – Another Successful(ish) Drawing!, and an Update
  39. Restarting a Stalled DrawBot Drawing
  40. TSP FTW!
  41. Speedier DrawBot Drawings
  42. Two new DrawBot links! And an update!
  43. Another Drawing Robot!!!
  44. The biggest inkjet printer ever
  45. Why do DrawBots draw on walls?
  46. All New Polargraph on the way!!!
  47. Ideas for improving my DrawBot
  48. DrawBot Aesthetic Re-Design Ideas
  49. Every Body Needs a Skull
  50. This project is not going to overengineer itself
  51. Overengineered Spools
  52. Overengineered Stepper Motor Mounts, Filament Guides
  53. Overengineered Bolt Endcaps, Case Holder
  54. Sourcing DrawBot Parts
  55. DrawBot - A Tour!
  56. DrawBot - A Preview
  57. Arduino Powered Drawing Robot Poll
  58. Building an Arduino Drawing Robot - On The Cheap
  59. DrawBot - Printed Parts Tour
  60. Unidentified Foam Object
  61. Arduino Powered Drawing Robot - Take 2 (Or 3)
  62. DrawBot, now ACTUALLY wall mounted!
  63. Drawing Robot Pen Holders, Calligraphy Pens, and Thought Experiments
  64. Ideal Qualities in a Drawing Robot Pen Holder
  65. Enough talk! Finally a pen holder!
  66. DrawBot Pen Holder Post Mortem
  67. To Maker Faire!!!
  68. Skipping! How could I forget the skipping?!
  69. PlotterBot at Maker Faire Bay Area 2013!
  70. PlotterBot.com - a new site dedicated to drawing robots
January 30, 2012 | Comments Closed

Probably my most popular design ever…

OpenSCAD Pirate Ship designed by MakerBlock, printed by BrazenArtifice

OpenSCAD Pirate Ship designed by MakerBlock, printed by BrazenArtifice


I can’t tell you how giddy I get when I see that someone has printed this and uploaded a picture. So, to the eight people who have done so – thank you!

Printed Pirate Ship

I’ve printed this pirate ship twice and am reasonably satisfied with the result.  The first I printed with support structure and the second without.  I’m still getting used to Skeinforge v35, so I hope to get a better result.  Interestingly, support isn’t really required for the bow!

October 25, 2011 | Comments Closed